book series


Last week, I had the fun of finally meeting in person my fellow writer and History Hoydens contributor Lauren Willig. Lauren was in California as part of a book tour for her novel The Seduction of the Crimson Rose. If you haven’t already discovered Lauren’s Pink Carnation books, do so now. They’re a wonderful Napoleonic Wars spy series, filled with adventure, intrigue, romance, playful allusions to The Scarlet Pimpernel, and an equally fun modern-day frame about a contemporary graduate student who is uncovering the history of the Pink Carnation while researching her dissertation in London. I was so excited to have a new book in the series to read, and it was a special treat to get to meet Lauren in person.

(more…)

In the comments to last week’s post (and thanks, everyone, for the great discussion!), Cate mentioned that while she had come to have more of an affinity with Mélanie on rereads, “I’m still not sure I would trust her as a friend, but I probably wouldn’t have a choice. I’d find her too interesting not to spend time with her, if she would deign to allow me.”

My first reaction was to be surprised and think “that’s interesting, I’d certainly trust Mélanie as a friend.” Then I re-examined it, because truth to tell it’s a question I’d never really considered. Would I trust her? Probably, because she’s very charming, and I suspect I’d never know what was going on in her head or what she really up to :-). Would I be wise to trust her? More difficult to answer. Mélanie’s very loyal. But as Cate said “She’s loyal, but she, like everyone, has a hierarchy of loyalties and she’s not likely to be changed.” And she can be quite ruthless when she makes up her mind what she needs to do.

(more…)

I had lunch with a group of friends on Saturday. We spent a wonderful afternoon eating delicious food and talking about books and television shows and favorite examples of story-telling in both. We discussed a number of writers and tv series, but our talk kept coming back to the writer who is the reason we all met. We got to know each other through a list serv that discusses the novels of Dorothy Dunnett.

I first discovered Dorothy Dunnett’s books the summer between high school and college. I picked up “The Game of Kings”, the first book in the Lymond Chronicles, and spent a couple of days curled up on the sofa, glued to the page. I promptly devoured the rest of the six volume series. I told my mother she had to read them. It took her a bit of time to get into “The Game of Kings”, but soon she was as hooked as I was.

(more…)

One of the things I love about blogging and the follow-up comments is how one topic can lead to another. That happened when the discussion on my blog last week about Disneyland and world building led to a discussion of book series (not so very far offtopic, as one of the things I love about series is the rich world building they allow for). A number of my favorite books have always been series, going back to when I was a child. I loved the Oz books–I liked a lot of the later books even better than “The Wizard of Oz”. My mother scoured used books stores and interlibrary loan trying to get the whole series. I moved on to Lloyd Alexander’s Prydain Chronicles. Traveling back and forth to Washington D.C. with my parents on business trips, I’d read two Nancy Drew mysteries each way. I loved the Georgette Heyer books that were connected (“These Old Shades”, “Devil’s Cub”, “An Infamous Army”), and I always wished her characters ran into each other more often.

(more…)